Blog on the Run: Reloaded

Friday, December 21, 2018 5:14 pm

Bill Kristol, Davidson College, and ethics

In public life some sins really are both disqualifying and unforgivable. Bill Kristol is guilty of at least two, and Davidson should have recognized that fact and chosen differently.  

I’m going to be very up-front about Bill Kristol: I do not like him. I never have. And despite his Billy-come-lately effort to vault to the front rank of never-Trumpers, I never will.

So what am I to do with the news that my alma mater, Davidson College, has named him its inaugural visiting Vann Professor of Ethics in Society for 2019? I think the college has made a big mistake.

First, let’s make clear what this ISN’T about. It’s not about censorship or free speech, which is an issue of government regulation, not private regulation. (Davidson is a private school.)

It’s not about exposing students to a broad range of views; Davidson already does that and has for many, many years. You’d have to have gone there to understand how truly laughable we alums find it that conservative critics on occasion have criticized Davidson as liberal.

For me, the mistake here, by Davidson and by the Vann family, who are funding this initiative, is to hold Bill Kristol up as someone from whom the rest of us can learn about applied ethics. Because unless the college were to identify Kristol specifically as a negative example, that certainly isn’t true.

One can disagree with Kristol about plenty, and that’s fine, and it wouldn’t disqualify him from speaking at Davidson or even holding a guest professorship in applied ethics. But I can point to two huge tests of applied ethics that Kristol failed, at a cost of hundreds of thousands of lives and of world-historical consequences that humanity still will be grappling with long after he and I are dead. Those tests were the use of torture as an instrument of U.S. governmental policy and the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

I’ve written a great deal on this blog over the years about the ineffectiveness and evil of torture — not just what it does to the victim but also what it does to the torturer and to the nation that sanctions the use of torture. You can plug “torture” into the search box over there on the right and find it all; it is, as the lawyers say, incorporated by reference.

Not only did Kristol support torture, , he also continued to support it even after all previous arguments for its use during the War on Some Terror had fallen flat. Why would Kristol — why would any human being — continue to support the use of torture even after all the practical arguments on its behalf have been weighed and found wanting? Is there an argument for supporting it other than a practical one? The War on Some Terror is 17 years old, and I have yet to come across such an argument. That Kristol has not repented of his views that I can find suggests he continues to support torture, and for what? For its own sake? That, I suspect, is a question for him and his counselor, but the fact that it exists ought to be disqualifying for a person expected to provide guidance to others in the field of applied ethics.

The other huge test of applied ethics that Kristol failed was the U.S invasion of Iraq in 2003. He and Robert Kagan were among the nation’s leading advocates for that invasion, and the only reason they weren’t the most effective was that George W. Bush, and not they, got to be the one to lie to Congress about the possibility of an Iraqi nuclear-weapons capability. To refresh your memory, most of Congress wasn’t buying what the Bush administration was selling about Iraqi weapons of mass destruction as a justification for invasion. The so-called “16 words” in President George W. Bush’s State of the Union address — the suggestion that Iraq was working on nuclear weapons, though the country in fact had no evidence that that was so — got Congress to authorize the U.S. invasion of Iraq, which, unlike Desert Storm in 1991, was illegal under the United Nations charter and international law.

Tens of thousands of U.S. service members were killed and wounded, along with hundreds of thousands of Iraqis, and the grossly mismanaged occupation of Iraq gave rise to ISIS.

As with torture, Kristol has never repented.

I don’t have a real slam-bang ending here. But in public life some sins really are both disqualifying and unforgivable. Kristol is guilty of at least two, and Davidson should have recognized that fact and chosen a different visiting professor of applied ethics.

 

 

 

Thursday, September 22, 2016 7:49 am

Milo Yiannopoulos in the Wildcats’ den

My alma mater, Davidson College, has invited alt-right icon, provocateur, and general sociopath Milo Yiannopoulos to speak next month. The event is open only to Davidson students and facstaff, not the general public. Here’s how the invite to that community was framed:

In keeping with the [Center for Political Engagement]’s dedication to discourse, we announce our first scheduled speaker for the 2016-2017 school year: Milo Yiannopoulos.

Yiannopoulos is a highly controversial writer at Breitbart and an incendiary public figure who loves messy and rough discourse, often intentionally using language and rhetoric to play on the emotions of his counterparts and undermine their argument.

We present him as he presents himself: a figure to grapple with, challenge and learn something from. We are incredibly excited to see what Davidson will bring to the table. We believe in your ability to rise to the challenges Yiannopoulos so purposefully puts forth. We believe in your ability to engage with ideas on any point of the political spectrum. We believe in your ability to take the ideas and rational, linear discourse of the classroom and translate that into a messy and real world interaction. We believe in the power of such conversation to both expand and hone our views and arguments.

The question now is: do you accept the challenge?

I have mixed feelings about this.

On the one hand, speaking at Davidson is a privilege, and I would rather that prestige, money and mindshare not have gone to someone who so gleefully contradicts most of what the college stands for, particularly its Honor Code.

On the other hand, this invitation reads like, if I may mix my metaphors, a shooting license to students: Come listen to this guy, and then, when he has had his say, cut him some new assholes. (And keeping the event Davidson-only means that Yiannpoulos won’t have his groupies on hand to disrupt the proceedings.)

I wouldn’t have done it. Inviting him — and accepting him on his own terms — gives him a legitimacy he hasn’t earned and doesn’t deserve and ignores the significant damage he and his groupies have done to reasoned public discourse in this country at a time when reasoned public discourse is rare, getting rarer, and probably more desperately needed than at any time since Dec. 8, 1941. It’s not quite as bad as inviting, say, Joseph Goebbels, but you can see there from here.

But now that the invitation has been extended, I also don’t think it can or should be rescinded. And I hope and trust that students will accept the invitation in the spirit in which it was extended, and show up with long, sharp rhetorical knives.

Thursday, April 9, 2015 8:22 pm

Odds and ends for April 9

Sorry, guys, I was on the road today, so I ain’t got much.

The Rhino Times commissioned a push poll by a conservative chop shop to make it appear there is more support for a measure to redistrict Greensboro City Council than there actually is. Doug Clark at the N&R calls them out on it.

Meanwhile, some Wake County voters have sued over the recent changes to the Wake Board of Commissioners imposed by the Republican-controlled General Assembly.

In other popular stuff carried out by the Republican-controlled General Assembly, a lot of middle-class North Carolinians saw their state income taxes go up this year. But hey! Tax cuts for the wealthy and big bidness!

Why Stephen Curry, and not James Harden, should be this year’s NBA MVP. (I mean, besides Davidson. Duh.)

Saturday, January 31, 2015 9:43 am

Odds and ends for Jan. 31

Every decent parent loves his kids. But even the best parent has days when he doesn’t much like his kids. So it is, this non-Catholic thinks, with Pope Francis and the Curia members who answer to him.

Late-night TV hosts mourn that Mitt Romney won’t be running for president again. Still a lot of clowns in that GOP car, though.

One of those clowns is Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal. Last time around, Jindal tried to market himself for president as an unthreatening technocrat and an immigrant son of the American Dream. It didn’t work, but at least it was well-intentioned and, I think, had some appeal across party lines. This time around, though, he has gone full-metal Pat Buchanan and pulled the immigrant ladder up after himself. I’m not sorry to delight in the fact that that won’t end well for him.

You Can’t Make This Up Dept.: The House Rules Committee is having a hearing on repealing Obamacare. On Groundhog Day.

told you people on Twitter that using the hashtag #Blizzardof2015 like there would only be one was hubris. And now the impending new winter storms in New England have reduced the National Weather Service to transmitting random Whitesnake lyrics instead of forecasts.

Speaking of Twitter, for sheer joy, follow the hashtag #ThingsBetterThanScarborough. MSNBC put Joe Scarborough on in prime time last night in place of Rachel Maddow, and her regular audience was not amused. My favorite contribution to the stream was, “live interns.”

Most Facebook tiffs are just that, but this one, in which I participate with my usual (ahem) charm, is a bit more noteworthy, in that N.C. Rep. John Blust makes it clear herein that he thinks the 14th Amendment to the Constitution, to which he swore oaths of loyalty as an Army officer and a legislator, is a bunch of hooey. When I first met Blust in 1998, I found him to be a likable, if painfully naive, politician. Now he’s just trolling us.

What in the pluperfect hell was this Seattle cop thinking?

EPA administrator Gina McCarthy has had it with you wackaloon conspiracy theorists. SCIENCE, bitchez!

My Tar Heels and Wildcats both have big games today, and I’ll likely miss both for working. So it goes.

 

Tuesday, January 27, 2015 10:13 pm

Odds and ends for Jan. 27

RIP President Obama’s plan to kill the tax exemption for 529 (college-education) accounts, age 7 days. You people who think the deduction for mortgage interest can be repealed are so cute.

In the 2016 Republican Presidential Candidates in Legal Jeopardy race, Rick Perry takes the early lead!

You people tweeting #Blizzardof2015 like it’s gonna be the only one? Also cute.

Speaking of Twitter, it wants me to follow Franklin Graham. Yet more reason to believe it’ll be a loooong time before Skynet becomes self-aware.

No Stephen Curry? No problem: My Davidson Wildcats just keep winning.

Greensboro is getting its first (legal) distillery since Prohibition. That’s the good news. The bad news: It’ll be making rye and bourbon. Meh.

Relatedly, the World of Beer restaurant chain is coming to Greensboro. But as for me and my house, we shall worship the Wall of Beer.

Everybody in Greensboro but me has been talking about the controversy at UNCG over its firing and attempted prosecution of three employees. I’m still not talking about it — nothing I could add — but perhaps this means we can soon move on to talking about other, happier things.

Google Fiber is coming to Charlotte and Raleigh. But not Greensboro. *sigh* All the more reason for Greensboro folks to get behind CityFi.

Don’t drink and drone.

Duke plays undefeated Virginia Saturday evening. I’ll be eating dinner with my bride and Tony and his bride. We win.

Sunday, January 25, 2015 11:03 am

Odds and ends for Jan. 25

I’ve had trouble finding time to blog at length about anything lately. (Working two jobs will do that to you.) So instead I’m going to return to the birdshot approach I’ve used under similar circumstances in the past. Blogging experts will tell you this is not how to maximize your audience, but blogging experts usually have only one job.

The News & Record’s Janice Carmac, a part-time employee to whom the paper wisely grants column space to from time to time, has a well-grounded, understated column today on the literally life-and-death importance of health insurance in general and the Affordable Care Act in particular, based on her family’s experience. Naturally, the paper didn’t put it online. UPDATE: It’s now online here.

Also in the N&R and of particular interest to Greensboro folks, columnist Susan Ladd righteously dopeslaps both Earl Jones and Mike Barber for their egregiously ill-intentioned dialogue over the International Civil Rights Museum and the larger issue of race in Greensboro. This is one of the few times where “both sides do it” really is accurate and contextual criticism.

My Davidson Wildcats beat George Mason on the road in OT last night to go 5-2 in the Atlantic 10 and win their second straight game (the first was against No. 22 Dayton) without their starting point guard. Someone remind me again how the ‘Cats were supposed to finish in the conference cellar this year.

If I were in charge of the Republican Party’s presidential-election efforts, I think I’d be doing everything short of human sacrifice to make sure that the first good look the nation got at my candidate pool wasn’t watching the richest of them suck up to two sociopathic billionaires right out of a James Bond film followed by watching the lot of them pile out of a clown car to genuflect in front of Iowa’s batshit insane religious-right GOP base.

Even as a final Supreme Court decision likely affirming the constitutionality of same-sex marriage approaches, some politicians — primarily Southern Republicans — continue to fight, pardon the expression, rear-guard actions against fairness and equality, as by threatening the state salaries of public officials who facilitate such marriages. The heathen rage for they know the end is near. And although I know that anecdotes are not equal to data, I must say that my own, different-sex marriage appears to have been remarkably unaffected by the advent of same-sex marriage here in North Carolina.

My Braves appears to have written off 2016, perhaps in hopes of fielding a strong team in 2017 when they move to a suburban stadium. No link; this is  just my (very disappointed) impression.

Politics 1, science and the future of humanity, 0: The U.S. Senate pretended not to be insane by voting 98-1 for a resolution stating the climate changes is real, then spoiled the effect by failing to approve (60 votes were necessary) a resolution saying that it is largely driven by human activity.

“Why do people in positions of power ask so many stupid questions?”

We’ve finally got teleporters. But still no jet packs. Grrr.

That’s all I’ve got. Time to work. A good week to all.

Tuesday, December 20, 2011 6:06 am

Gloat? Moi?

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 6:06 am
Tags: , ,

A number of my friends are Kansas Jayhawks fans, and I love them all dearly.

Still: In your face, guys.

Tuesday, October 25, 2011 12:55 am

Who knew one radio network could hold so much Stoopid?

I did not realize this until just moments ago, but apparently NPR’s ombudsman, Edward Schumacher-Matos, wrote last week about the Lisa Simeone case. Even by the standards of in-the-tank ombudsmen, the piece is remarkably incoherent: It talks about NPR’s code of ethics for journalists while 1) failing to note that Simeone was a contractor for a contractor, and thus beyond any reasonable understanding of NPR’s control with respect to stuff she did on her own time, and 2) insisting that “Simeone has no influence or role in NPR news” and that “the issue surrounding her, therefore, is a management and legal one.”

My response, which might or might not get past the moderators:

Ed, could you possibly be any more disingenuous?

Your organization went after Simeone — who was neither an NPR employee nor a contractor, but was, rather, a contractor of a contractor, for political reasons, for things she was doing on her own time. That’s bad enough. Then your organization TRIED TO GET MY ALMA MATER TO DO YOUR DIRTY WORK FOR IT. And when my alma mater quite sensibly refused, your organization stopped syndicating the program. At least one D.C. lawyer I’ve talked to has described NPR’s action as “tortious interference with contractual relations.” You want a “management and legal issue”? Congratulations; you’ve got one. If I liked popcorn at all, I’d be making some right now.

What NPR did was bad enough, and you’re just compounding the error by lying about it in a way that makes quite clear you think your audience is dumber than linoleum.

So noted.

Good God, these people are idiots.

(UPDATE, 10/25: Schumacher-Matos’s Twitter feed makes quite clear he is toeing a party line: The phrase “not a news issue” appears repeatedly. In the unlikely event that it wasn’t a news issue before, it is now. That he is not recognizing that fact means either that he’s on the take or that he’s too stupid to be holding his current job. I’m sorry to be personally abusive, but there really aren’t any other plausible explanations for his behavior on something that perhaps, once, briefly, was “not a news issue” but which 1) originated with a flawed news report and 2) is now ricocheting around The Atlantic, the Huffington Post and the online writings of some of the nation’s most prominent press critics.)

I also finally got around to sending an email to Dana Rehm, the NPR spokesbot who was babbling about all this last week. I wrote:

Dear Ms. Rehm:

As a Davidson College alumnus, a former WDAV-FM staffer and someone who has freelanced a time or three in the past 35 years, I’ve watched NPR’s behavior in the Lisa Simeone case with growing disbelief, anger and disgust. First you did something stupid. Then you tried to get my alma mater to do your dirty work for you and apparently lied about it. Then you dropped “World of Opera” out of what appears to be nothing more than sheer petulance and spite. Certainly, I can see no journalistic, moral, ethical, legal or PR upside for NPR to what you did, and as a guy with almost 35 years in media, I’ve looked at it from every possible angle.

I’ve also blogged about it here and here and gone after the author of the original Roll Call piece here for her crappy reporting. (In the likely event that I hear nothing more from her, I’ll move up her food chain to her editors, too: This was either a malicious fabrication or Roll Call tanking for a source with an agenda, and either way, I’m not going to let it go.)

The good news for you is, my blog doesn’t normally get much traffic. The bad news is, because I was briefly almost  famous in the media biz a few years ago, the traffic it does get is kind of influential.

And since I first blogged about this subject, my daily traffic has gone up an order of magnitude. I realize you’re surprised. After all, no one could have foreseen that in this era of job insecurity and increasing incidence of sole proprietorship and freelancing, a lot of people might think that there’s something badly wrong with NPR’s trying to screw around with the livelihood of a contractor’s contractor. One lawyer I’ve talked to in D.C. thinks Simeone might actually have a cause of action against you for tortious interference with contractual relations. If I liked popcorn at all, I’d be making some right now.

The first rule of holes, Dana, is: When you’re in one, stop digging. Put the shovel down before you hurt yourself, and the country, any further. And while I appreciate your giving my alma mater the opportunity to look good in the national spotlight twice in one week, you really need to rethink how you’re doing business if you want to avoid serious harm to the country, let alone stay in business much longer. There’s a war against accountability journalism going on right now. I’ve been a Red State Republican for 33 years, and yet even I don’t think I’d much like the country I’d be living in if accountability journalism loses. If you think there’d be a place for you, you’re delusional.

Best,

Lex Alexander

In the unlikely event that she responds, you’ll see it here.

Sunday, October 23, 2011 4:24 pm

So how did all this stink with NPR and Lisa Simeone get started in the first place?

Not surprisingly, with a bone-headed play by the So-Called Liberal Media.

In this case, it was a short piece by Roll Call’s Neda Semnani, who writes the “Heard on the Hill” column. From the snarky headline to the factual inaccuracies, it is one steaming, stinking heap of FAIL.

So late Friday, I emailed her:

Hi, Neda:

I thought I’d fill in some gaps in your reporting on Lisa Simeone. Whether you choose to share this information with your readers or not, I leave to your conscience. Oh, and my blog. Hee.

Lisa Simeone is a FREELANCER. For WAMU (until her unjustified dismissal). And for WDAV, for whom she continues to produce “World of Opera.” Although she did, once, work for NPR, she hasn’t had any direct, formal relationship with the network in quite a while.

Have you ever been a freelancer? Because I don’t think you have. It’s a tough gig. For one thing, overentitled clients generally presume that because they pay you to produce a certain body of work, they assume control over all other aspects of your public life EVEN IF THEY HAVEN’T BOTHERED TO OBTAIN THE CONTRACTUAL RIGHTS TO DO SO.

No, dear. The technical term for that is “slavery,” and it was outlawed by the 13th Amendment. Jim Asendio should have known that. So should you.

If WAMU had wished to obtain that level of control over what Simeone did on her own time, it was perfectly entitled to negotiate for the rights. It failed to do so. I’m not a lawyer, but I’ve freelanced off and on since 1978, and because whether I ate or not depended on my attention to this level of detail, I’m confident I’m accurate when I say that absent other evidence of which I am unaware, not only was WAMU’s action unjustified, but also that Ms. Simeone has grounds to seek, at the least, a buyout of the remainder of her contract, if any, and possibly other damages.

As for WDAV, for which I once worked, and which is operated by my alma mater, it didn’t need any of this explained to it. The station and college looked over the contract with NPR under which they produce “World of Opera” for NPR, decided that they were in full compliance and politely told NPR to take a flying flip at a rolling doughnut.

“If you want to be a hack, don’t flack.” No, Neda; if you want to be a journalist, you need to start calling bullshit on every noncontroversy that the right-wing Wurlitzer tries to gin up into a Category 5 scandal. I’ve been a Red State Republican since 1978, and even I get that. You’re being played, and the fact that NPR management has the political savvy and common sense of dryer lint (see: Williams, Juan) doesn’t let you off the hook. [Note that I am giving her the benefit of the doubt here and presuming that she’s just passing along a bug someone put in her ear, rather than presuming that she fabricated a controversy on her own initiative. — Lex]

Pity Roll Call doesn’t take comments, but if this is an example of its “journalism,” I can see why.

Best,

Lex Alexander
Davidson ’82
WDAV-FM 1978-82
Her response was, to say the least, puzzling:

Hi Lex,

Many thanks for your email. I spoke to and used Ms. Simeone’s quote in my original post. I have her on tape, which is what I used. I was quite explicit about her role as a freelancer and a host. I was clear about the information I had as I received it, including stating that she was not fired from her post as host of NPR’s World of Opera in my follow up item.

I have passed your email to my editor.

If you have any further comments and concerns, feel free to email me any time.

Many thanks,
Neda

For those of you following along at home, the question wasn’t the accuracy of Semnani’s quoting of Simeone. It was the accuracy, or lack thereof, of what she was saying about what Simeone said. So I responded:

Neda:

Thanks for responding. I wasn’t questioning the accuracy of your quote. I was pointing out that your snarky item …

… she said, “Well, I work in radio still, but this is totally different.”

Huh. Different, how?

“I’m a freelancer,” she said.

OK …

… completely misrepresented the nature of a freelancing relationship by making clear with the “OK …” that you thought Simeone was full of shit. In fact, her position has a basis in everyday contract law.

You also allowed Jim Asendio to assume facts not in evidence, as the lawyers say. What he says is true if and only if WAMU’s code of ethics is incorporated directly or by reference into the freelance contract the station has with Ms. Simeone. If it isn’t — and your article offered no evidence that it is — then he doesn’t get to decide after the fact that she’s a journalist and therefore bound by some code of ethics to which she never agreed.

I’m not only questioning your abilities as a journalist, I’m now also questioning your ability to read plain English. Feel free to share that with your editor as well.

Cheers,

L.

Haven’t heard any more from her, but she’s entitled to a weekend, too, so that’s fine. I’ll let you know what else, if anything, transpires, although I’ll be subject to the demands of work, school and parenting and so might not be able to do so in anything approaching real time.

More on Lisa Simeone, “World of Opera,” NPR and WDAV

When last we spoke, Thursday evening, NPR had said that it was going to have a “conversation” about the fact that Lisa Simeone, the freelance host of “World of Opera,” her political involvement in her spare time and WDAV’s relationship with the network in supplying “World of Opera” for syndication by the network.

I emailed the general manager of WDAV, who promptly informed me that he and the college already had had their own conversation about Simeone, determined that what she did on her own time was her own business and were going ahead with business as usual.

And if things had been left to lie there, all would be well. But NPR being NPR, it ignored the First Rule of Holes: When you are in one, stop digging. Instead, it found a way to make itself look even stupider by announcing that it would stop syndicating “World of Opera” to 60 stations nationwide.

In stark contrast to that behavior, WDAV and Davidson College simply and quietly did the right thing yet again, announcing that if NPR didn’t want to distribute the show anymore, they would do it themselves. Station general manager Scott Nolan emailed me yesterday to specify that the new arrangement would take effect Nov. 11.

We’ve already established that Lisa Simeone has no formal relationship with NPR, as employee or as freelancer, which means NPR has no legal, moral or ethical justification for attempting to regulate her political involvement on her own time. Given the pontification of NPR news staffers — news staffers, not producers of opera showson Fox News and other outlets, it is difficult for anyone with half a brain to think that NPR cares about the ethics or appearance or bias of its news people in general and quite easy to believe that something altogether more sinister is at work, whether right-wing political conspiracy or simple petulance.

NPR never should have tried to make an issue of Simeone’s off-duty political involvement in the first place. And once it did, it certainly never should have expected WDAV and Davidson College to do its intellectually dishonest and journalistically unethical dirty work for it. It is difficult to understand NPR’s decision to stop distributing the program as anything other than a childish act of pique, the raving of a clueless dinosaur as it sinks into the tar pits of its own irrelevance and oblivion.

But we need to ask a question: Why is it OK with NPR for NPR employees Mara Liasson, et al., to do what they do and be paid for it, but not OK for Lisa Simeone, a freelancer, to do what she does on her own time for no money? What is the moral or ethical difference in the behaviors? Why is the NPR’s response to the differing behaviors so dissonant? And what does that dissonance tell us about NPR’s news credibility, ability to navigate ethical questions and overall common sense?

The honorable behavior of my alma mater and former employer stands in stark contrast to that of NPR. It is, yet again, a good day to be a Wildcat.

But it’s a bad day, and has been a bad decade, to be an American in need of smart, credible news and information programming produced by insightful, ethical people. Those Americans are screwed, and the Occupy movement of which Lisa Simeone has been just one small part is one big sign that a lot of Americans aren’t going to stand for it. If they Occupy enough voting booths, some things will happen on the political front, but I suspect the only thing that will change NPR will be extinction. The network certainly hasn’t demonstrated an ability to learn from experience.

Thursday, October 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Letter to Scott Nolan, general manager, WDAV-FM, re: Lisa Simeone UPDATE: … and his reply

UPDATE 2: Please click on the link below and join me in thanking President Quillen for doing the right thing. If you’d also like to thank her for making Davidson look good in the process, that’s fine, but I won’t insist on it. ;-)

UPDATE: DAMN. I had no sooner hit “send” on that email and begun copying and pasting it into the blog here when Scott Nolan called me.

Long story short, I am delighted to report that he, the station and the college are doing all the right things here for all the right reasons. They’ve reviewed the terms of their contract with NPR to provide content — i.e., the opera show Simeone produces. They have concluded that the college is in compliance with every stipulation of that contract, and they’re going to ignore the national media and keep doing what they’re doing.

It is a good day to be a Wildcat.

(As you might expect, I bcc’ed a lot of people on that email. I’ll be letting them know about this conversation immediately.)

* * *

cc: Dr. Carol Quillen, president, Davidson College

Scott:

As a Davidson College alumnus and former employee of WDAV-FM during its critical early years as a high-powered broadcast outlet, I was more than a little dismayed to learn that NPR was “in conversations with WDAV about how they [sic] intend to handle” Lisa Simeone.

Here’s some free advice from someone with decades of experience in media and PR: You don’t. You listen politely to NPR, you then tell its representative to take a flying flip at a rolling doughnut and you let Ms. Simeone keep doing what she’s doing for WDAV without interruption or hassle. (If nothing else, I’m sure my late father, Class of ’52, founding member of the WDAV advisory board and a board member at Opera Carolina for about two decades, would appreciate it. He’d have loved her show, I think.)

There are so many things wrong about this situation that it’s difficult to know where to start. Fortunately, that’s exactly the kind of situation where I’ve eaten, professionally speaking, for the past 30 years.

First, if I understand the situation correctly (and I might not; I’ve seen conflicting reports in major media outlets), Lisa Simeone is a freelancer for WDAV and has no direct, formal relationship whatever with NPR anymore. That being the case, then absent any written agreement between the station and her with respect to how she will conduct herself off the air, the station simply has no jurisdiction — no moral, legal or ethical standing to tell her what she can and cannot say, what groups she can and cannot participate with, whom she can and cannot represent besides WDAV. If, going forward, the station finds it valuable to control that conduct, it is welcome to attempt to reach a contractual arrangement with her on that point and to attempt to compensate her accordingly. She, of course, is free to tell you to go to hell, and if you’re foolish enough to try to achieve that goal, then for reasons that have nothing to do with politics and everything to do with my having been a freelancer off and on for much of my career, I sincerely hope she does.

Second, although there are no true First Amendment issues here as no government agency is involved so far as I know, Davidson College and every college and university worth the name has a strong interest in defending freedom of expression, particularly unpopular expression. One of the unfortunate side effects of the evolution of the American economy from one based on manufacturing to one based on knowledge — and, therefore, frequently on relationships — is that otherwise rational people can and do sever perfectly productive professional relationships because overentitled jackasses get a bad case of butthurt over something someone said or wrote or blogged or tweeted about them. The academy, of all our institutions, ought to be the one that stands up and points out both the impracticality and the immorality of shutting down unpopular speech. If you have a problem with that, you’re welcome to seek employment in the for-profit sector. I hear it’s hiring. Oh, wait.

Third, moving from the general to the particular, what, exactly, is it of which Ms. Simeone stands accused? Depending on which news account you read, she’s guilty of being a “spokeswoman” or “organizer” for Occupy Wall Street — again, on her own time, separate and apart from her work for WDAV. Unfortunately, neither NPR nor anyone else has bothered to explain exactly what that even means, let alone why it’s a bad thing. Moreover, from everything I’ve read or heard about Occupy Wall Street and its offshoots (including first-hand accounts from my brother and sister-in-law in Raleigh, friends here in Greensboro, friends in New York and other participants), one of its defining characteristics is that anyone who wants to be can be an “organizer” or “spokesperson” for the movement. It’s a consensus movement, not a hierarchical one. While that might not bode well for its political effectiveness, it also makes defining moral and ethical transgressions on the part of any one participant problematic when we’re talking about an act of speech as opposed to, say, defecating on a police car. Put another way, the terms are meaningless. Two nights ago, as a joke, I created the Twitter hashtag #LWS — Liquidate Wall Street. (This was before Bloomberg Business News broke the story that Bank of America intends to try to stick taxpayers with a looming $53 TRILLION loss on its derivatives; in 24 hours, Liquidate Wall Street evolved with no effort on my part from joke to logical policy proposal, but that’s a different subject altogether.) Does my having created that hashtag make me an “organizer” or “spokesman” for the Liquidate Wall Street movement? If so, neither I nor the movement appear to be deriving much benefit.

Finally, I would point out something that I hope already has become obvious to you in your dealings with NPR: In matters relating to politics — a subject on which its news coverage purports to have some expertise — NPR cannot find its own ass with both hands and a flashlight. It has mishandled every major story of the past decade related to important political issues, from war crimes to the economy, health care to regulation. Probably not coincidentally, it has failed to recognize that it is facing ongoing, coordinated political attacks from one and only one side of the aisle that are bent on destroying it because they are bent on destroying accountability journalism entirely. I have been a registered Republican since 1978, but even I am not blind to this phenomenon, nor do I care for the likely national consequences if this effort succeeds. NPR is blind, willingly or otherwise, but you need not let your affiliation with the network blind you, too.

What you do, or choose not to do, is up to you. But you need to understand that your actions and those of the college in whose name you operate will be watched carefully and interpreted in the context of the values for which this country and Davidson College purport to stand.

Best,

Hooper “Lex” Alexander IV ’82
Greensboro, NC
www.lexalexander.net

Friday, April 16, 2010 6:14 pm

The kid is alright

Filed under: Cool!,Wildcats — Lex @ 6:14 pm
Tags:

Stephen Curry: The future is now:

[Tyreke Evans of Sacramento] will win the prestigious ROY with relative ease … but he WON’T be the best player from his class.

No, you didn’t misread that.

Such an honor applies to another gem playing in northern California — Stephen Curry. …

While Curry hasn’t put together an entire season worth of brilliance as his brethren, he has shown enough of his talent to be appointed as the premier player in the 2009 NBA Draft class. …

To put it in layman’s terms: while Evans is undoubtedly impressive, Curry will ultimately become the better player.

Read the whole thing. It’s that good. Curry is that good: the kind of point guard you can build a franchise around, the kind of shooter who has to be respected out past 25 feet, the kind of accurate, unselfish rock-disher that other franchise players line up to play with when they become free agents.

He could even make me care about the NBA again, which I haven’t done in almost 20 years.

(h/t: John Burns on Facebook)

Tuesday, March 2, 2010 6:22 am

Davidson: Two 3’s in 2.2 seconds. For the win.

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 6:22 am
Tags:
See more funny videos and Sports Videos at Today’s Big Thing.

UPDATE: The video has disappeared. Copyright issues, I guess. The question is, how could code that was in MY WordPress account be deleted remotely by someone who’s not me? I change passwords regularly. Anyone at WordPress want to step up to the plate?

ANOTHER UPDATE: YouTube FTW!

Tuesday, December 29, 2009 11:50 pm

Odds and ends for 12/29

Gettin’ back at ’em: Wall Street’s 10 Greatest Lies of 2009 and 10 Ways to Screw Over the Corporate Jackals Who’ve Been Screwing You. For informational purposes only; no endorsement implied. IANAL. Void where prohibited. Etc.

Waykewl pitchers: Time’s “The Year in Pictures 2009,” National Geographic’s “Top Ten Space Pictures of 2009.”

Denzel in the house: Denzel Washington came to the Davidson-Penn game last night to watch his son’s team lose to the Wildcats. (Malcolm Washington converted a 3-point play for the Quakers’ final points of the game.)

Connecting the dots: Fecund Stench does an excellent, if scary, job of it.

I’m sure the Right-Wing Noise Machine will apologize to the Dixie Chicks right after it excoriates Ted Nugent.

Following in the footsteps of the other death merchants: Like the tobacco industry before them, the health-care industry, not satisfied to mess things up at the national level, is now also messing things up at the state level.

Attention, deficit hawks: Despite what you may have learned in Right-Wing Math Class, a $900 billion health-care program that’s paid for is NOT as big a problem as a $9 trillion unfunded liability.

Chase and Citibank are dropping out of the FDIC 4K program. Uh, what does that mean, you ask? Basically, they’ve found a way to do more gambling with your money.

Two Panthers are going to the Pro Bowl, RB DeAngelo Williams and DE Julius Peppers. RB Jonathan Stewart’s final stats may outshine Williams’s. Peppers, on the other hand, is tied for 305th in the league in tackles through Week 16, with 39; ranks tenth overall, and sixth among defensive ends (fifth among DEs in the NFC), in sacks; tied for 177th in passes defended (eighth among DEs), with five. In his defense, he is tied for third in the league with five forced fumbles and is among only four DEs in the league who have returned an interception for a touchdown.

Carbon gap: All the blather about a carbon/environment/clean-energy bill is overshadowing an ominous fact: China is going to eat our lunch in this arena … if we let it.

Quote of the day, from Bruce Schneier: “Only two things have made flying safer [since 9/11]: the reinforcement of cockpit doors, and the fact that passengers know now to resist hijackers.” So let’s 1) stop wasting hundreds of millions of dollars a year on equipment and people that don’t do what they’re supposed to do and 2) stop making flying commercial any more of a miserable experience than it absolutely has to be. Thank you.

Another quote of the day, from Osama bin Laden, which we really ought to look at again before rushing off to start new wars in Yemen and Somalia: “All that we have to do is to send two mujahidin to the furthest point east to raise a piece of cloth on which is written al-Qaida, in order to make the generals race there to cause America to suffer human, economic, and political losses without their achieving for it anything of note other than some benefits for their private companies.”

John Dugan owes us trillions, and if he can’t pay, I say we have the Mafia (who pay sales taxes, if nothing else) break his legs.

Pat Buchanan: Still crazy.

Speaking of crazy: It’s time to stop giving Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., air time. He handles it worse than I handled Jell-O shots, which is pretty bad.

I wouldn’t call it a “fix,” but it’d definitely be an improvement: NYU online-journalism guru Jay Rosen suggests the Sunday talk shows start fact-checking their guests. Unlike Jay, however, I wouldn’t wait ’til Wednesday to post the corrections. That ought to be happening in real time, online and with live screen crawls.

Speaking of fixes, if we want to fix the terrorism problem, we have to start with the engineers. They’re dangerous, I tell you. Including my brother.

Mashup du jour: This is genius.

Attention, police: You can’t Taser people just because they don’t do what you want them to do anymore. Not that all that many of you were doing that to begin with, just as almost none of you hit people over the head with your batons just for the hell of it. But those few of you who have been doing this are now on legal notice that you need to stop.

Elections have consequences, and the biggest consequence of the 2008 election so far is that the people who worked hardest to elect Barack Obama president have been serially and collectively screwed.

Reasons to freak out: Number of Americans who’ve died this year for lack of health insurance: about 45,000. Number who’ve died from salmonella: about 600. Number who’ve died from terrorism, including all those at Fort Hood: 16. Let’s keep this in mind before we soil ourselves, shall we?

Parker Griffith didn’t just take a congressional seat with him, he also took some of the Alabama Democratic Party’s voter-registration data. His primary is June 1, so get your popcorn early.

And I’ll bet you thought the story of Orly Taitz and the birthers couldn’t get any weirder: BZZZT! Wrong!

OK, maybe the world really WILL end in 2012, because it sure can’t keep going like this: DougJ at Balloon Juice for the win: “Let’s be frank: at this point, there is no real difference between Michelle Malkin and the Washington Post editorial page, none between Marc Ambinder and Matt Drudge, none between the Republican Congressional delegation and RedState. We have Jim DeMint holding up the confirmation of the head of the TSA while simultaneously acting as the point man for Republican criticism of the TSA … and he’s getting a lot of traction in the very liberal media. Maybe there is no value in saying this over and over again, but our public dialog really, really sucks.”

And, finally, just because it’s cool and you deserve a reward for reading this far:

Sunday, October 11, 2009 9:49 am

The kid is all right

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 9:49 am
Tags:

With regular starter Stephen Jackson suspended for two games, Stephen Curry got the start last night for Golden State against the Suns. How’d he do?

In 37:18, he scored 18, going 6-12 from the field (2-5 from behind the arc), 4-4 from the stripe, with 7 rebounds, 7 assists, 4 TOs and a block. On defense, he held the Suns’ Steve Nash to 2 points.

Tuesday, May 19, 2009 8:28 pm

I Love College Commons

Filed under: Fun,Wildcats — Lex @ 8:28 pm
Tags: , ,

Some Davidson College athletes, among them Stephen Curry, wrote and appeared in this video, a paean to Vail Commons, where most of Davidson’s students eat. (The commons has been there awhile; it opened just a year or two after I graduated, I think.) It’s a takeoff on “I Love College,” which is somewhat more risque.

Thursday, January 29, 2009 5:37 pm

Just in case you wondered whether he can hit NBA 3-pointers …

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 5:37 pm

Stephen Curry, sharpshooter:

Thursday, January 22, 2009 8:15 am

Davidson 83, Furman 43

Filed under: Victoria,Wildcats — Lex @ 8:15 am
Tags: , ,

Took Victoria down to see the Davidson-Furman game last night. I’m perfectly good with blowouts, and that’s what this one was. Davidson led by as much as 48 points late.

Here’s Victoria with the Wildcat statue across from Belk Arena before the game:

Victoria with the wildcat statue outside Belk Arena vs. Furman, 1/21/09

Victoria with the wildcat statue outside Belk Arena vs. Furman, 1/21/09

Here’s Victoria with her face painted:

Victorias cat-claw face paint vs. Furman, 1/21/09

Victoria's cat-claw face paint vs. Furman, 1/21/09

And after the game, Stephen Curry (30 points, 5 rebounds, at least 2 steals) was officially recognized as the Sporting News 2008 College Athlete of the Year:

Stephen Curry is officially recognized as Sporting News 2008 College Athlete of the Year

Stephen Curry is officially recognized as Sporting News' 2008 College Athlete of the Year

V. had a blast, the ‘Cats won big and Steph got some well-deserved recognition. It’s all good.

Tuesday, November 25, 2008 9:15 pm

Cold autumn night

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 9:15 pm
Tags:

Bottle of Malbec: $12.99
Fire log: $3
Calmly and comfortably listening to the Wildcats audio on the laptop while watching closed-captioned TV: Priceless. Duh.

Tuesday, November 4, 2008 12:23 pm

Wildcat rising

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 12:23 pm
Tags: ,

This time a year ago, hardly anyone knew about Stephen Curry. They know now. In addition to being named a finalist for the Wooden Award last spring, he’s now on the preseason All-America team.

Will he match or exceed last year’s blisting 25+ scoring average while also moving from shooting guard to the point, succeeding graduated national assist leader Jason Richards? “His contribution to the team should change some,” the AP delicately puts it. Let’s hope that means adding big assist numbers to his scoring average.

Mom got Davidson season tix, so I hope to see a few games this year. I doubt there’s any way this year’s team exceeds, or even matches, the 2008 version, but they should be exciting to watch.

Tuesday, May 27, 2008 6:45 pm

Because I am still not tired of this stuff …

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 6:45 pm
Tags: , ,

(h/t: DrFrankLives)

Sunday, May 18, 2008 1:23 pm

The fame, it is spreading

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 1:23 pm
Tags: , ,

The Wildcats are now a pop-culture reference!

(h/t: Mom)

Monday, April 7, 2008 7:36 pm

One last look back …

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 7:36 pm
Tags: ,

… to the beginning of the season, when Andy Katz of ESPN picked Davidson at 23 in his preseason poll. (He also correctly picked Memphis, UNC, UCLA and Kansas in his preseason top 4, if by “correctly,” you mean “this year’s Final Four”). Of the ‘Cats, he said, “Don’t really care if you think this pick is crazy. Davidson has one of the hidden gems in Stephen Curry. Bob McKillop is one of the top coaches who gets zero pub. This team will win 28 to 29 games and be a tough out in the NCAAs. So deal with Davidson in the Top 25.”

Stephen Curry, hidden gem? Check, until he took just four games to play his way to All-American. McKillop, top coach? Just ask Kansas. Win 29 games? Check. Tough out in the NCAAS? Once again, just ask Kansas.

Last fall, practically the whole world outside the Southern Conference had no idea. This time, the whole world knows they’re coming.

Tuesday, April 1, 2008 12:10 pm

Stephen Curry, All-American, cont.

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 12:10 pm
Tags: , ,

This just keeps getting better and better. Curry is one of five finalists for the John R. Wooden Award, given to college basketball’s top player. Could he top Tyler Hansbrough or the rest of the finalists? After the past two weekends, who knows?

I guess people do watch the NCAAs after all, huh?

(h/t: my colleague Eddie Wooten)

Stephen Curry, All-American

Filed under: Salute!,Wildcats — Lex @ 7:22 am
Tags: , , ,

Second team, but still. As a colleague from Sports points out, he played his way into this honor, surpassing bigger names from bigger schools with massive PR machines.

On the biggest national stage in college basketball, he went from practically unknown outside the Southern Conference to national star in just two weekends.

Years from now, when people ask how good Stephen Curry really was, this will be the answer.

Sunday, March 30, 2008 8:58 pm

Good thing they struck loans from their financial-aid packages

Filed under: Victoria,Wildcats — Lex @ 8:58 pm
Tags: ,

Victoria now says she wants to go to Davidson.

Coulda. Shoulda.

Filed under: Wildcats — Lex @ 8:55 pm
Tags: , ,

So close. This close. And it need never have come down to a last-second desperation shot.

If just two of those early first-half clunkers had gone in. If the team had shot 8 for 12 from the line, well within its capabilities, instead of 5 for 12.

The Wildcats can take heart from the fact that in all other aspects of the game they played well enough to win.

But taking heart just isn’t enough today.

Next year? Jason Richards is gone, and as I said earlier, a Davidson point guard will not lead the nation in assists again in my children’s lifetimes. That tells you all you need to know right there.

Still, we can take pride in the class with which the team represented the school. It was a couple of weeks to remember, and if 1969 is any guide, I will remember, long after today.

UPDATE: After CBS spends a week promoting Davidson as a Cinderella story, the CBS Web site says Kansas puts an end to Davidson’s “feel-good nonsense” with a “convincing” win. “Feel-good nonsense”? They beat the Big East and Big Ten champions. And a 2-point win that almost wasn’t is “convincing”?? [Expletive.]

(h/t DFL)

Saturday, March 29, 2008 12:43 pm

For everyone who entered the NCAA pool this year …

Filed under: Fun,Wildcats — Lex @ 12:43 pm
Tags: , ,

… comes this, via the Divageek:

Friday, March 28, 2008 9:26 pm

One dead badger, Southern-fried; or, How to impress LeBron James

Filed under: Fun,Wildcats — Lex @ 9:26 pm
Tags: ,

With all due apologies to my former colleague Steve “Turbo” Witmer, my bud Paul Lubbers and Athenae at First Draft, Wisconsin partisans all, I must say: How ’bout them ‘Cats?!?

The Davidson Wildcats are in the Elite Eight for the first time in thirty-nine years. That’s Thirty. Nine. Years.

And just how good do you have to be to make NBA All-Star LeBron James, who was sitting in the Davidson section, mouth the word “Wow!” on national television?

I got to watch the game on our friends Lee and Emily’s high-def projector, so the picture was about 7 feet diagonally — even my aging eyes could see Just. Fine.

I am a happy camper tonight. And I can only imagine what the campus must be like right now.

Sweet Caroline



I’ve always wondered how it was that Davidson fans came to embrace this Neil Diamond hit. The only connection I could make was that it came out in 1969, the last time the Wildcats advanced beyond the first round of the NCAAs. Fortunately, The Charlotte Observer is here to explain it.

It’s hard to explain how this feels. The last time I was this invested in such an underdog was 1977, when UNC-Charlotte made the Final Four, knocking off No. 1 Michigan in the process.

This is even better.

UPDATE: This from Mom, who lives there: “This town is crazy right now. Biggest thing to happen to us since the Harris Teeter opened in February.”

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