Blog on the Run: Reloaded

Monday, October 14, 2013 7:56 pm

JPMorgan Chase just posted its first quarterly loss in a decade.

Yes, the nation’s largest bank lost $388 million. Alex Pareene of Salon explains why that matters:

… in one important sense, this loss doesn’t really “count.” The loss didn’t happen because the things JPMorgan does to make money stopped making money, the loss happened because JPMorgan has spent a fortune — a truly staggering amount of money — defending itself against legal inquiries and paying fines for bad behavior. This quarterly loss is the result of the bank needing a couple billion dollars to spend on lawyers and fines and fees, with a few billion set aside this quarter as “part of a $23 billion pot the bank has set aside to cover mounting legal costs.” Take away those costs, and you have a bank that is making almost as much money as usual. “Excluding litigation expense and reserve release,” according to Reuters, “the company posted a profit of $5.82 billion, or $1.42 per share.”

As Felix Salmon has said, a fantastically profitable bank is a bank that is extracting rents from the economy. A bank that would be fantastically profitable if it weren’t for the expense of dealing with myriad investigations into its corrupt and criminal activities is a bank that would seem to have reached the limits of its rent-extraction strategy.

So crime is baked into JPMorgan Chase’s business model. The nation’s largest bank apparently is little more than a continuing criminal enterprise, as defined under the RICO act, if it has to put billions, with a “B,” aside in just one quarter for legal defense. But nothing bad will ever happen to JPMorgan Chase because Barack Obama’s Justice Department can’t be bothered to investigate world-historical swindles, and nothing will happen to CEO Jamie Dimon because CEOs aren’t responsible for the crimes of the corporations they are so handsomely rewarded to run. Ever.

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Tuesday, January 31, 2012 9:41 pm

“Abracadabra,” or “Stick ’em up”?

Like Keyser Soze in “The Usual Suspects,” some $1.2 billion in customers’ money has disappeared from MF Global Holdings Ltd., the trading firm run by former U.S. Sen. Jon Corzine, D-N.J.:

Federal officials looking for an estimated $1.2 billion missing from customers of MF Global Holdings Ltd. feel more and more that a lot of it may never be located, according to a report citing sources familiar with the probe.

What’s been learned so far suggests that a good deal of the money may have “vaporized” because of scrambling in trading in the week before MF Global filed for bankruptcy protection Oct. 31, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing “a person close to the investigation.”

Many now think specific MF Global employees used money from a customer account meant to be walled off and used it to cover collateral requirements or to unfreeze assets of banks and others as they became more worried about how exposed they were to MF Global, the Journal reported.

The probe also is looking at other possibilities that have taken on weight, including the chance that the firm lost a lot in investments that used customer money, according to the report.

At least, that’s what they’re saying in public. Duncan “Atrios” Black thinks the truth might be a little different:

No the money hasn’t disappeared, they’re just making clear that whoever took it is unlikely to relinquish it. Whoever took it is more important than the people it was taken from. … And a new standard will be established: the right people are free to steal $1.2 billion.

And who might those people be? Emptywheel hazards a guess:

I actually don’t think Federal Reserve Bank of NY Board Member Jamie Dimon got his hands on the almost $3 billion of Iraqi money deposited in the FBRNY that has vanished.

An audit by [Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction Stuart] Bowen’s office published on Sunday investigated the roughly $3 billion the Iraqi government gave the Defense Department to pay bills for contracts the Coalition Provisional Authority awarded before it dissolved in 2004. Most of these funds were deposited into an account at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.  Even though DOD was responsible for maintaining the proper documentation, it could only account for $1 billion of the money.

“It’s symptomatic of the poor record keeping that was rife throughout the early stages of the reconstruction effort,” Bowen, who has conducted three other major audits into the original pot of roughly $21 billion in Iraqi funds the U.S. managed in 2003 and 2004, said.

After all, that money dates to 2004 and Dimon’s service on the FBRNY Board didn’t begin until January 2007. (Though I will note that Jamie Dimon and Iraq’s money overlapped at the FBRNY for a year.) Moreover, it was DOD’s responsibility to keep track of the money, not the FBRNY or Jamie DImon.

Still, I can’t help but notice that the announcement that we’ve lost almost $3 billion of Iraqi’s money (on top of the more than $100 million in cash that managed to walk out of Saddam’s former palace) came within a day of the time some are declaring the missing MF Global $1.2 billion has “vaporized.”

[snip]

That money does seem to have been lost in the immediate vicinity of Dimon’s JP Morgan.

As the week progressed, MF Global executives came to believe that JPMorgan Chase & Co., one of MF Global’s primary bankers and a middleman moving that cash, was dragging its feet in forwarding the funds.

Corzine phoned Barry Zubrow, then JPMorgan’s chief risk officer, to question the slow payments. Corzine also called William Dudley, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, to update him on MF Global’s status and told him that payments were slow to arrive from JPMorgan and others.

[snip]

JPMorgan was able to slow the delivery of funds, worsening MF Global’s distress. As a result, they note, hundreds of millions of dollars of MF Global money may be still stuck in accounts at JPMorgan.

So while I’m not suggesting Jamie Dimon bears any personal liability for these missing billions (or those of Lehman or Bear Stearns), I will note that Dimon seems to have the 21st Century equivalent of the Midas Touch: Rather than turning things into gold when he touches them, when billions get within reach of Jamie Dimon, they seem to vaporize.

For the record, I have no earthly idea where either the MF Global money or the Iraq money went, but I’m confident that it didn’t go wherever it went accidentally. Would it be irresponsible to speculate? It would be irresponsible not to.

Sunday, February 28, 2010 9:58 pm

17 million reasons why Jamie Dimon needs to STFU

Filed under: I want my money back. — Lex @ 9:58 pm
Tags: , ,

The grossly overpaid CEO of JPMorgan Chase believes that the government has treated his company unfairly even while keeping it, you know, alive:

Jamie Dimon, the chief executive of JPMorgan Chase, says he believes Washington has become increasingly erratic and unfair in its treatment of the banks over the last few months, and he now has some regrets about participating in the government’s Troubled Asset Relief Program.

“F.D.I.C. is going to cost us a lot of money. TARP cost us a lot of money. This bank tax, my first reaction was, ‘That will cost us a lot of money,’” Mr. Dimon said Thursday at the bank’s annual Investor Day conference in New York. “I think we are getting into the capricious, arbitrary and punitive behavior.”

So it wasn’t enough for us to keep his company running and his personal gravy train on the tracks. No, we have to do these things exactly the way he wants us to.

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