Blog on the Run: Reloaded

Wednesday, March 14, 2018 9:49 pm

God, how much would these people whine if they’d LOST?

There are a lot of voters out there who either have a lot to learn or who will never learn. I was reminded of this by the response of some Democrats to the (apparent, razor-thin) victory of Conor Lamb last night in the special election for Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District seat.

Lamb won by a couple of hundred votes — a small fraction of a percentage point — out of more than 210,000 cast in a district that went for Trump in 2016 by 20 percentage points. That’s remarkable in and of itself. What’s even more remarkable is that Lamb won despite the fact that the GOP spent $10 million against him and for his GOP opponent, Richard Saccone. (Fun fact: The GOP holds roughly 110 House seats that are more competitive than PA18, and they don’t have the money to spend $10 million on every one of them.)

How did he do it? He’s an ex-Marine (and as any Marine will tell you, there’s no such thing) and an ex-prosecutor, so at least on the surface, no one could question his patriotism or his stance on crime. (Surprise: He’s against it.) He says he’ll vote for women’s reproductive freedom. He supports the Affordable Care Act and believes in universal coverage. He wants to defend Social Security and Medicare. He explicitly supports unions, which even most Democrats hesitate to do anymore.

But some of the other ways he did it upset some on the far left edge of the Democratic Party, because Lamb had the temerity to vote for some things voters in his Pittsburgh-area district actually wanted. He supports fracking, which is big in PA18, albeit with strong government oversight. He supports gun rights, also big in PA18, where the opening of deer season is pretty much a national holiday. Although he says he’ll vote pro-choice, he’s personally anti-abortion.

I have one question for these people: Where was the pro-choice, pro-universal-health-care, pro-Social Security, pro-Medicare, pro-labor, anti-fracking, pro-renewable energy, pro-gun control, personally-OK-with-abortion candidate on the ballot in PA18 last night?

That’s right: There wasn’t one.

But you know who else WAS on the ballot last night? Rick Saccone: A guy who wants to cut taxes on the rich even more, who’s anti-labor, who thinks that the “free market” can “fix” the Affordable Care Act, who’s an anti-immigrant bigot, who claims to have “successfully negotiated with the North Koreans,” and who was endorsed by future defendant Donald J. Trump.

Those were the realistic choices in PA18. (A little-known independent candidate got a little over a thousand votes.) Your perfect candidate and mine were not on the ballot. So what are you going to do?

Here in the real world, you have these choices: 1) Vote for Lamb. 2) Vote for Saccone.

Yeah, you could vote for the independent candidate. But here in the real world, in 99.9% of cases, voting for the independent candidate really is a vote against the major-party candidate whose views align more closely with those of the independent candidate.

And you could have not voted at all. People do that. “The lesser of two evils is still evil,” you pout. But here in the real world, I spent most of my adult life in journalism, covering politics — two worlds in which pure black and pure white are incredibly hard to find. So maybe I’m missing something. But I’ve scoured the real world looking for what that might be and come up empty. If you find it — here in the real world — let me know.

And in this case, standing on that assertion would be a remarkably privileged thing to do, because one vote up or down on, say, the Affordable Care Act here in the real world could make an annual difference of thousands of Americans living or dead. Multiply that across such issues as gun control and climate change and pretty soon you’re talking about a lot of dead people. Add to that the fact that current GOP tax and economic policy are destroying the middle class, sending a lot of people into poverty here in the real world. If you’re morally retarded enough not to care about those deaths and that impoverishment, go to hell.

The time to go after your perfect candidate is in the party primary, but you need to know that whether your choice wins or not, whoever wins is not going to be your perfect candidate. That’s a unicorn. It’s a chimera. It doesn’t exist. You probably won’t even like the winner very much as a person. In more than 40 years of voting at all levels of government, I can point to maybe three people I voted for whom I didn’t want to just slap on a regular basis. THAT’S JUST LIFE. DEAL WITH IT.

The media spend a lot of time and effort telling you that there’s no major difference between the two major parties. That’s a lie. Research shows that in fact there’s a bigger gap between them than at any other time since 1860. It also shows that more than 80% of so-called “unaffiliated” voters reliably vote for one major party or the other more than 80% of the time.

There’s no perfect candidate. No savior. At this point in our history there is no middle. And just for grins, one of our two major parties, in its rejection of facts both economic and scientific, has gone batshit insane. But for God’s sake keep telling me how the lesser of two evils is still evil.

Conor Lamb was not my ideal candidate. But he was a good enough candidate for his particular House district to keep it out of the hands of someone who was a hell of a lot worse. By the lights of Lamb’s critics on the left it was an ugly win.

But you know what they call an ugly win? A win.

Now say “You’re welcome” and don’t whine again. And if you’re ever again tempted to whine, go down and file and run yourself.

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